A new study has found that using three-dimensional virtual reality models to prepare for kidney tumor surgeries resulted in substantial improvements, including shorter operating times, less blood loss during surgery and a shorter stay in the hospital afterward.

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A new finding suggests that the pediatric sleep study -- used to diagnose pediatric sleep apnea and to measure improvement after surgery -- may be an unreliable predictor of who will benefit from having an adenotonsillectomy.

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Scientists have shown for the first time that severe brain cancers integrate into the brain's wiring.

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Babies born vaginally have different gut bacteria -- their microbiome -- than those delivered by caesarean, research has shown. Scientists discovered that whereas vaginally born babies got most of their gut bacteria from their mother, caesarean babies instead had more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts. It isn't known if these differences at birth will have any effect on later health.

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Scientists have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain.

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Because researchers demonstrated for the first time that a strong association between obesity and chronic diarrhea is not driven by diet or physical activity, the findings could have important implications for how physicians might approach and treat symptoms of diarrhea in patients with obesity differently.

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The immune system is highly complex and a detailed understanding of many underlying mechanisms is still lacking. Only the precise interaction of a variety of factors guarantees a reliable and correct immune response in a healthy body. Misregulated immune responses are a major cause of a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmunity, and immune deficiency.

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A team has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori -- a fairly common occurrence in some parts of the world. They identified a complex interaction which resulted -- among other effects -- in a weakening of the adverse impact of the pathogens acting individually.

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New research has found that individuals raised in families with higher socioeconomic status were more optimistic in midlife, and in turn, lived longer. Those who experienced more psychosocial stressors, such as parental death, frequent moves and harsh discipline, tended to encounter more stressful life events in midlife, and had greater risk of dying.

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An international research consortium was able to identify what is likely an optimal combination of chest compression frequency and depth when performing CPR.

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A minority of people who use illicit opioids indicated a preference for fentanyl, the super-potent synthetic opioid that accounts for much of the recent rise in US overdose deaths, according to a new study.

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A new study finds that most US physician practices and hospitals report screening patients for at least one social need, a trend that is expected to increase in the future, and that practices that care for disadvantaged patients report higher screening rates.

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A new study conducted in songbirds demonstrates that what at first appear to be genetic constraints on birds' song learning abilities could be largely eliminated by tailoring instruction to better match the birds' inborn predispositions.

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Scientists have designed a new method for post-operative wound closing and healing that is both fast and effective. This strategy revolves around engineered 'cell sheets' -- or layers of skin-based cells. The procedure culminates in a wound dressing that is custom made for a specific cut or lesion that can be used to effectively treat open skin areas after surgeries. The findings were published in Scientific Reports on July 18th.

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It sounds like science fiction: controlling electronic devices with brain waves. But researchers have developed a new type of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode that can do just that, without the sticky gel required for conventional electrodes. Even better, the devices work through a full head of hair. The researchers now report on the flexible electrodes, which could someday be used in brain-computer interfaces to drive cars or move artificial limbs.

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