A research team has examined the interplay between genetics, cardiovascular disease and educational attainment in a major population study. Genetic variants which had been linked to educational attainment in other studies were observed in the subjects. The researchers found that these variants also had implications for a more health-conscious lifestyle and thus a lower risk of cardiovascular disease - in some cases regardless of the level of education.

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How do people with psychopathic traits control their 'dark impulses?' A team of researchers are finding answers in levels of gray matter density in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain involved in the regulation of emotions, including fear and anger.

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Researchers have described the role of mitochondrial fission factor (MFF) in controlling survival of cancer cells, suggesting the protein could represent a promising therapeutic target.

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The first extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen which is responsible for millions of bloodstream infections per year in sub-Saharan Africa, have been identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Drug-resistance has increased in successive groups of S. Typhimurium over time. These new strains are resistant to all but one of the commonly available drugs in the DRC, with one sample showing reduced susceptibility to this final antibiotic.

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Scientists have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time-frames of just one quadrillionth of a second -- or a femtosecond.

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A new study reports that the prevalence of overweight dogs is markedly larger among overweight owners than among normal weight owners. Part of the explanation lies in whether treats are used as training tools or ''hygge-snacks''.

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Researchers have identified a previously unknown mechanism that regulates release of insulin, a hormone that lowers blood glucose levels, from the beta cells of the pancreas. This mechanism is disrupted in type 2 diabetes. The scientists hope this finding will be used to develop new treatments against the disease.

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With a study of the network between nerve and muscle cells in turtles, researchers have gained new insight into the way in which movements are generated and maintained. In the long term, the new knowledge may have an impact on the treatment of, for example, ALS and spinal cord injuries.

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New research has shown how parental engagement has a positive effect on a child's academic attainment -- regardless of age or socio-economic status. The study, conducted by the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter, also highlighted areas of promise for how schools and early years settings can support parents in a way that improves their children's learning.

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This study aimed to propose a new method for a bi-objective optimization. Ten student participants used a touch screen at 3 different installation heights, 3 tilt angles and with 3 button sizes. The joint angles, while using a touch screen, were measured to estimate physical workload. With the subjective screen visibility determined, the Pareto optimal solution showed ranges of 1124-1251 mm height and 44.4-67.9° tilt angle for the optimal installation of touch screens.

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Researchers have found changes in molecules in the blood that might be new markers of type 1 diabetes. New findings may help understand the early pathogenesis of the disease.

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A new study details a possible solution for fine-tuning inflammation and cellular activity in cardiac recovery -- thanks to an antibody initially developed for rheumatoid arthritis. 

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To help physicians provide the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is recommending physicians measure how frequently they complete annual assessments of people age 65 and older for thinking and memory problems.

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A new study suggests that the extinction of Neanderthals may be tied to persistent, life-long ear infections due to the structure of their Eustachian tubes, which are similar to those of human infants.

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In a proof-of-concept study, researchers have shown that exosomes harvested from human skin cells are more effective at repairing sun-damaged skin cells in mice than popular retinol or stem cell-based treatments currently in use. Additionally, the nanometer-sized exosomes can be delivered to the target cells via needle-free injections.

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