The human brain holds the secret to our unique personalities. But did you know that it can also form the basis of highly efficient computing devices? Researchers recently showed how to do this, through graphene-diamond junctions that mimic some of the human brain's functions.

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The more crawling experience a baby has, the more likely they are to avoid falling into water, a new study shows.

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X-ray imaging is a fast and painless way for doctors to see inside a person. But radiation detectors, which go under the body part being imaged, are rigid panels that contain harmful heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Now, researchers report a proof-of-concept wearable X-ray detector prepared from nontoxic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) layered between flexible plastic and gold electrodes for high-sensitivity sensing and imaging.

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An artificial pancreas could soon help people living with type 2 diabetes and who also require kidney dialysis. Tests show that the device can help patients safely and effectively manage their blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of low blood sugar levels.

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Researchers have developed a molecule that fluoresces where new tissue is forming in the body. Alongside helping to detect tumors, the molecule could play a significant role in research of wound healing disorders.

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In a proof-of-concept study, researchers have created a coating that can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity. The innovation could reduce upper-airway bacterial inflammation during intubation, a situation that can lead to chronic inflammation and a condition called subglottic stenosis, the narrowing of the airway by an accumulation of scar tissue.

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Adults infected with SARS-CoV-2 exhale different metabolites in their breath than uninfected people. Now, researchers have shown that children infected with SARS-CoV-2 also show breath metabolite changes, but they're largely different from the ones in adults. Someday, this information could be used to quickly and easily screen children for infection, the researchers say.

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Release of the brain's equivalent of THC, marijuana's active component, reduces seizure activity but leads to post-seizure oxygen deprivation in the brain, scientists have shown.

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Scientists have identified nearly 300 gene variations that influence reproductive lifespan in women. Additionally, in mice, they have successfully manipulated several key genes associated with these variants to extend their reproductive lifespan. Their findings substantially increase our knowledge of the reproductive ageing process, as well as providing ways to improve the prediction of which women might reach menopause earlier than others.

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The first-ever molecular images of an olfactory receptor at work answer decades-old questions about odor recognition.

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An RNA-modifying protein elevated in some aggressive cancers has been shown to be a promising target for new drug development.

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Using data from two large, long-running study projects in the Puget Sound region -- one that began in the late 1970s measuring air pollution and another on risk factors for dementia that began in 1994 -- researchers identified a link between air pollution and dementia.

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A structural analysis of llama-derived nanobodies interacting with SARS-CoV-2 describes three mechanisms the microscopic molecules use to disarm the virus and its variants, pointing to new therapeutic possibilities -- including a universal coronavirus vaccine.

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A new study finds that work place interruptions are beneficial to a sense of belonging and can counterbalance negatives such as lost productivity.

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The average American eats roughly 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day -- more than three times the recommended amount for women and more than double the recommended amount for men. Although this overconsumption is known to contribute to diabetes and other disorders, the exact ways in which eating too much sugar sets the stage for metabolic diseases on a cellular level has been less clear. Now, a team has found that surplus sugar may cause our cellular powerplants -- called mitochondria -- to become less efficient, reducing their energy output.

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