Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology.

Read more..

Humans choose food based on the way it looks, smells, and tastes. But the microbes in our guts use a different classification system -- one that is based on the molecular components that make up different fibers. Investigators found particular components of dietary fiber that encourage growth and metabolic action of beneficial microbes in the mouse gut.

Read more..

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the build-up of fat in the liver due to factors other than alcohol, but its cause remains unknown. Now, researchers have linked NAFLD to gut bacteria that produce a large amount of alcohol in the body, finding these bacteria in over 60% of NAFLD patients. Their findings could help develop a screening method for early diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver.

Read more..

New research suggests that over the next few decades, acting to reduce climate change is expected to cost much less than the damage otherwise inflicted by climate change on people, infrastructure and ecosystems.

Read more..

To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles.

Read more..

Nonhuman primates with clinically undetectable Plasmodium relapse infections still harbor parasitic gametocytes that may be infectious to mosquitoes, according to a new study.

Read more..

About 1 in 3 diabetic patients develops diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can impair vision and lead to blindness. A new study provides clear evidence that high glucose increases the levels of enzymatic precursor -- lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) -- that promotes cell death, which was verified in an animal model of diabetes. These findings may help develop novel DR treatments by targeting LOX-PP or its metabolites.

Read more..

Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. Now a new study explains why: It's easier for criminals to find collaborators.

Read more..

New research has identified characteristics and gender-specific behaviors in kids that could lead them to become juvenile hackers. The researchers assessed responses from 50,000 teens from around the world to determine predictors of hacking and are the first to dig into gendered differences from a global data set.

Read more..

A method to create a faster and lower cost alternative for a gene therapy tool.

Read more..

The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. Having achieved great success in elucidating these structures in recent years, biologists are now taking on the next challenge: to find out more about how they are constructed. A new research project now provides insight into a very unusual construction process in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

Read more..

Proteins are essential for every living cell and responsible for many fundamental processes. They are required as biocatalysts in metabolism and for signalling inside and between cells. Many diseases are due to failures in this communication, and the origins of signalling in proteins have been a source of scientific debate. A team has observed the mobile protons that do this job in every living cell.

Read more..

Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: healed bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture. Scientists found that a certain protein, which is more prevalent in older people, interferes with bone healing. They hope this discovery will lead to new treatments to help people heal after injuries or surgeries.

Read more..

One of the top qualities that we look for in a long-term partner is kindness, according to new research.

Read more..

People with persistent back pain or persistent headaches are twice as likely to suffer from both disorders, a new study has revealed.

Read more..